Category: value

Don’t hate the Anti-Vaxxer

     It’s easy and convenient nowadays to take a few minutes to rally against the “Anti-Vaxxer” movement. With the recent measles outbreaks, there’s no shortage of articles, memes, jokes and cartoons to share on blogs, Facebook, Twitter etc. But I’m going to throw a very small teeny tiny microscopic bone to the Anti-Vaxxer camp. I will do so with the disclaimer that as a primary care physician I think vaccines are an extremely important part of good health. Anyone that doesn’t see their value, is misguided and perhaps misinformed.

    Having said that, there’s no denying that the Anti-Vaxxer  movement  is real and unfortunately seems to be growing. They have quietly become a significant part of the general population. The reason for their growth is multifactorial, but the easiest targets are probably defrauded scientists, celebrities and politicians with dubious opinions. But the target that’s probably hardest to identify is the one looking right back at us in the mirror.  When a problem afflicts society, the easiest thing to do is blame others. The introspective route asks us to look within to identify causes and offer solutions.

     How did we let this happen? The Anti-vaxxer movement is just another example of the growing mistrust and lack of faith in our doctors and healthcare system. There are many reasons for this. When it comes to vaccines, why aren’t we, the trusted physicians able to educate and change their minds? Perhaps we are not living up to the true latin meaning of the word “Doctor” which is “to teach.” Perhaps the modern doctor,  gathered and taught in traditional (antiquated?) methods are struggling with modern informed patients who challenge and question rather than accept paternalistic physician decision making. Perhaps we simply just don’t have time to have a decent conversation with our patients about the importance of vaccines.
    Whatever the reasons, we need to figure out better ways to connect with this subset of our patients whose beliefs about vaccines post significant individual and community health risks. What we don’t need to do is further alienate this population by kicking the proverbial horse while it’s down. The amount of  seemingly joyous vitriol pouring from the medical community against anti-vaxxers is disappointing and at times bordering on classless. Social media is teeming with derogatory descriptions of this population.  I think this only furthers many people’s views of rampant intellectual elitism in our doctors. The most disappointing stance on this issue is when doctors proclaim they will refuse to see patients who don’t believe in vaccines. Hey genius, if you don’t see that patient, then they definitely don’t stand a chance of getting a vaccine!
   The anti-vaxxer type of population is something that has always existed in most medical practices. They represent a group of people who don’t believe in the gospel you are preaching. I have patients who don’t believe in cancer screenings, statins and a whole host of other great evidence based ideas. They can be frustrating and time consuming.  But they are still my patients and I will continue to respect them and care for them with the confidence to know I will eventually change some of their minds.

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Fast Food Medicine

“Would you like fries with that?” 
“Would you like to upgrade to a large soda instead of a medium?”
“Would you also like an additional blood test for Lyme disease?”

Sure why not? I love fries!
And a larger drink? Heck yeah, if it’s only a few cents more.
I’ll also take that Lyme disease test, just to be on the safe side!
The above sounds like a great fulfilling experience.
You get delicious inexpensive food, served by very pleasant and efficient people that were also willing to cater to whatever you want. You also get a doctor who seems to really care and thorough by ordering a battery of tests. It’s the kind of experience and place that anyone would want to keep coming back to, again and again.
This is not the typical experience many patients (consumers?!?) have when they interface with our general healthcare system. Healthcare is not inexpensive, not convenient at all and the quality of the product is variable. And in many cases the experience is very unpleasant.
“Necessity is the mother of all invention.”
What started out as filling a void for overcrowded emergency rooms and unavailable primary care physicians, urgent centers have been flourishing. It’s simple supply and demand. Supply of primary care doctors are dwindling and the demand for more convenient patient care is increasing. Now in any of your neighborhoods, you can get coffee, fast food and some “healthcare” rather quickly and merrily. 
I’ve gotten used to counseling my patients on the dangers of obesity and its association to fast food. Lately, I’ve had to start counseling my patients on the dangers of fast food medicine. Although I recognize their need and why they appeal to patients (consumers!?!), I have serious concerns about the impact Urgent Care centers have on healthcare at large. Just in the past few years, these are the types of issues I’ve noticed from care provided by such places.
Over prescription of antibiotics
Unnecessary use of broad antibiotics
Shot gun blood work with spurious findings
Recommendations to pursue unnecessary advanced imaging
Unnecessary recommendations to see specialists
Patient expectations for over treatment and extensive work ups

These are just broad generalizations but after a years, my patient sample size is growing.
I’m not a business man, but in the “for-profit” world” you do things that get you paid (x-rays, blood work?) and you give the consumer what they want to ensure return business. These are dangerous business concepts when applied to healthcare and urgent care centers are rapidly becoming the prime example of this. 
As the cost of our healthcare approaches 20% of our GDP and medical educators at all levels preach value and cost, urgent care centers, retail clinics and their profit incentives threaten to undermine this entire movement.

I’m not the only one that is worried about this.
The link below comes from a blog post on Kevinmd.com echoing similar sentiments.