Category: Social media

IOS, Android and the battle for my #mhealth soul

The preamble story to this discussion is as follows.

My 3 year old son is quite adept at using my Iphone. He was more interested in my phone than the Macy’s Thanksgiving day parade. He was so engrossed in it, I had to physically carry him to the bathroom to take care of business. In that process, he accidently dropped it in the toilet. My phone was toast. I shrieked and cried (on the inside) while I had a  massive digital heart attack.

Now it’s decision time.

My initial instincts were to stick with what I knew and the Apple ecosystem that was flourishing in my home for the past 7 years. My wife has one. My kids use a 2nd generation IPAD  for their activities. I also use a 3rd generation IPAD mini for work and day to day activities. We even have our old Iphone 4’s in our kid’s bedrooms that play music and function as a sound machine for their sleep. We also have Apple TV’s for entertainment purposes. My wife and I also share a Mac desktop. This ecosystem has been working well, but admittedly has given me Apple tunnel vision and a general fear of  trying Android devices.

In addition, my interest in the concept of #mhealth has been growing recently. Specifically I’m appreciating  how remarkable smartphones are and their potential to  be a game changing element in healthcare.

In medical education, mobile devices like a smartphone gives trainees and veteran clinician’s access to real time evidence based information. Social media is a ubiquitous platform for networking, advocacy and expanding medical knowledge. There is a growing capability of technology to collect numerous forms of patient data with the smartphone being the fulcrum that processes that information and connects patients to their clinicians. #Mhealth is and can be so many different things. We are just scratching the surface of its immense potential.

With that in mind,  I’ve started a #mhealth interest group within the Society of General Internal Medicine. We will be meeting for the first time this spring and I look forward to collaborating with people want to explore this area further.

SGIM 2016 Annual Meeting

But it took my precocious son’s butter fingers to make me realize I’m only experiencing  half of the #mhealth world by avoiding Android devices. So with much trepidation but in an effort to be a more complete digital physician, I’m going to jump ship from Apple temporarily. I hope by the time the SGIM meeting rolls around, I’ll have a better perspective on the smartphone #mhealth world.

I’m already noticing a difference. I have so many different phones to chose from…

And what’s KitKat, Jellybean and Lollipop???

🙂

 

Twitter Grand Rounds

I’m currently into my 2nd week of life here at UTSW with most of my time committed to orientation related things. But today, I was able to resume one of my favorite activities as an academic internist which is attend departmental grand rounds. It’s great because the numerous disciplines in internal medicine all gather in one place to hear a respected colleague discuss important research, clinical and non clinical topics in medicine. Today’s grand rounds was especially noteworthy because it was given by someone within my own division (general internal med) on the unique topic of secondary cancers in adult survivors of pediatric cancers. As always, it was informative and captured my full attention.
But grand rounds wasn’t always as exciting for me. As a junior faculty in my prior institution I would find myself sitting there at 8 AM, staring at power point slides desperately trying to keep focused or even stay awake. Despite interesting topics and engaging noteworthy speakers, I didn’t get much out of it. That was until I entered the world of Twitter and became fully engaged in grand rounds by live tweeting. From that moment, grand rounds became an active fun event instead of a passive attempt at learning (an experience far too familiar from my days in medical school). Twitter became my platform for self learning and engagement as well as an opportunity to share important medical advances and concepts with the world at large. I looked forward to learning and the challenge of feverishly tweeting key facts and themes. Soon, other faculty members, house-staff and medical students became involved as we developed a virtual back channel conversation each morning of grand rounds.
Now after having left my prior institution for several months I’ve resumed my live tweeting of grand rounds, having learned several interesting things about pediatric cancer survivors and their heightened risks of adult cancer. In that process, I’m confident, a few others out there in the Twitterverse have a learned a few things as well.  And like most things in social media, the connections we make are a two way street. There are many others out there, doing what I’m doing, sharing their knowledge via social media in an effort to connect our minds and expertise for the purposes of improving medicine.

@SBinternalMed
Twitter account run by former colleagues with tweets from grand rounds, noon conferences and much more!

#foamed
Free open access medical education hashtag.

#meded
Medical Education hashtag

#grandrounds
A generic hashtag of all kinds of grand rounds across the world.

@shabbirhossain
My twitter account

Sir William Osler conducting Grand Rounds
(courtesy of the medical archives at Johns Hopkins University)

Top 10 reasons I use Twitter in Healthcare

I’ve been on Twitter for almost a couple of years now and when I talk to people about it, I still get a healthy dose of skepticism.
So I’ve put together a top ten list of why as a physician and medical educator, I use Twitter.
 
10: Connecting with Leaders
To be lead, you must know what your leaders are thinking. Twitter has made leaders accessible. Now, instead of spending time looking for their opinions or hoping to catch a handshake or meeting at a conference, they send their thoughts directly to me, in small increments of 140 characters, everyday!
 
9: Connecting with Followers
As physicians, you are a leader. Whether it ‘s in your office, your patient panel, your learners, your colleagues, your academic society, you have the opportunity (and responsibility? ) to lead and lead effectively. Twitter allows you to share your thoughts in small increments, reach a vast audience with minimal effort. Quoting #10, “To be lead, you must know what your leaders are thinking.”
 
8: Networking
The importance of professional networking cannot be understated. Twitter easily connects people with similar interests. In less than 2 years, I have been able to access a vast network of people interested in things that are important to me such as Primary Care, Medical Education, Social Media, Evidence Based Medicine and Healthcare Technology. In the past, networking for me occurred in spurts, at pre-determined locations over a finite period of time. With Twitter, networking happens 24/7, with little effort no matter where you are (and in your pajamas, while watching tv!).
 
7: It makes me an active learner.
All through my education I took notes. Writing things down helped solidify that piece of knowledge. A notebook was also useful for exams, reviewing and reinforcing information. Now instead of a notebook, I have a tablet and instead of a piece of paper, I use twitter. The 140 character limitations forces me to be succinct which makes my virtual notebook very easy to review.
 
6: I can educate the world
This is a grandiose statement, but Twitter makes it real. As a Medical Educator, I take pride in being able to influence the learners in my immediate proximity. With Twitter I can take all those notes  (See reason #7) and broadcast it to learners in other cities, states, countries and continents! Currently I’m using the the hashtag #sbmgr to broadcast what we’re learning in our Internal Medicine Grand Rounds every Wednesday 8:30 to 9:30 AM.
 
5: I can attend multiple conferences simultaneously, year round.
Until human cloning technology advances, Twitter is the best way to be at multiple places at once.  I wish I could attend every medical conference out there. But thanks to people who prescribe to reason #7, I can virtually attend other conferences through my smart phone, all throughout the year. There are thousands of people out there like myself, live tweeting from conferences. This year, I personally attended ACP and APDIM live tweeting from both. But in addition, while being back home, I followed the tweets from Kidney Week and Chest in the past couple of months.
 
4: It’s a forum for debate
Healthy debate is part of our lives as physicians. New guidelines and treatments are always coming up, and Twitter I get immediate access to viewpoints from a wide variety of people. I often get immediate feedback on my own opinions.
 
3: My mom taught me to share
We are all online, all the time. As a physician, I’m always finding a great journal article, an interesting blog,  or an important news article. Before twitter, I had no mechanism to share that, besides e-mailing to a small set of people or writing it down somewhere and hope that I have an opportunity to suggest it to people. Now, every website has a Twitter link. You see something cool, you can share it with a large audience with just a few clicks.
 
2: The world at any given moment
Whenever I have a free moment, Twitter  is my go to activity. In 2 minutes, I can scroll through a myriad of messages and get a burst of information from a network of my choosing.  So it’s whether pumping gas, waiting for an elevator, a 15 minute lunch, a commercial break during the football game, Twitter helps me use these small snippets of time, constructively.
 
1: It broadens my mind
In patient care we are emphasizing a team-based approach that values the roles of every individual in a healthcare team. The same can be said for my continuing medical education. I think I have something to learn, from everyone. As a result I follow folks in Internal Medicine, sub-specialties, family medicine, psychiatry, surgery and so on. I follow nurses, physical therapists, social workers and patient advocates. I follow patients (not my own) sharing the story of their medical conditions. I am learning something from everyone from the palm of my hand.
 
If this doesn’t get you interested in Twitter, here’s a a blog post from someone who’s listed 140 Health Care uses for Twitter
In addition, here’s another post to help you make the leap.
 
Top Twitter Myths and Tip  by Dr. Vineet Arora who is Director of GME Clinical Learning Environment Innovation and Assistant Dean of Scholarship & Discovery at the Pritzker School of Medicine for the University of Chicago.
Addendum 2/12/2017
A few days ago,  a terrific group from http://www.ausmed.com got in touch with me about a great blog post on their site called Twitter for Nurses. Check it out!
Keep on tweeting everyone!